Heblish – Hebrew lessons: Day 34

Tenses

Free Hebrew lessons – August 2010 – Training – Day 34:

Shalom,

I really don’t understand why everybody says it’s hot. I’m sitting here at my computer, drinking a cup of hot tea, listening to beautiful music, the air conditioner is on… and everything is OK… 😉

In our previous lesson we learned how to say maim (water) and shamaim (sky). We learned the word for “of / belonging to”, shel and its inflections, and we mentioned again the 3 tenses in Hebrew: past, present and future.

Today we’ll take another step ahead and learn 3 new words and their inflections.

Today’s menu: The present – singular form

Attention: The underlined letters represent the accent.

In Hebrew there are 7 different forms of verbs.

Let’s imagine seven different buildings, each building holds one form.  If you know how to conjugate one word in a building, you can do that for all the other “neighbors” (the other verbs in that building).

Hebrew is a very structured language, but I’m not sure if I’m going to teach you in the traditional way, like I learned in school. Now you might want to say, “goodbye Yaron, it was nice to meet you, see you one day – maybe…”

So what I’m going to do is, teach you the main rules which effect the most conjugations, or persons.

The present

Rule number 1
In the present – there are only 4 inflections for EVERY Hebrew verb:
– Singular for (m) – (m) means masculine
– Singular for (f) – (f) means feminine
– Plural for (m)
– Plural for (f)

Today we will learn only the singular form.

English subject pronouns Hebrew subject pronouns
I / I am Ani
You / you are (m) Ata
You / you are (f) At
He / he is (m) Hu
She / she is (f)  Hi (remember, the “i” sounds like “ee”)

 

Where is the “it” subject pronoun?
You sometimes say that Hebrew is a difficult language, but I’m not sure about that… in English there is a subject pronoun “it,” but there is no “it” in Hebrew.

Dogs and men are the same… oh, wait… wait… I wanted to say… OK, dogs and men are the same ;-)… but I meant to say that human beings, animals and objects are the same, in Hebrew. There are no words like “it“, “which” or “who,” which can tell us if we are talking about a man or about his dog…

NOTE:  Remember, in Hebrew there is no word for “am/is/are” – it is inferred in “ani, ata, hu,” etc.  In other words, “ani” means “I” and/or “I am”; “ata” means “you” and/or “you are”; “hu” means “he” and/or “he is,” and so forth.  It takes a little getting used to for the English speaker, but it is really a great feature of the Hebrew language.

Today’s new words: sit, write & learn

Masculine:

  I / I am (m)Ani You / you are (m)Ata He / he is Hu
Sit / sitting yoshev yoshev yoshev
       
Write / writing kotev kotev kotev
       
Learn / learning lomed lomed lomed
       

 

I, you, he:
Sit – Ani yoshev, ata yoshev, hu yoshev.
Write – Ani kotev, ata kotev, hu kotev.
Learn – Ani lomed, ata lomed, hu lomed.

 

Feminine:

  I / I am (f)Ani You / you are (f)At She / she is Hi
Sit / sitting yoshevet yoshevet yoshevet
       
Write / writing kotevet kotevet kotevet
       
Learn / learning lomedet lomedet lomedet
       

 

I, you, she:
Sit – Ani yoshevet, at yoshevet, hi yoshevet.
Write – Ani kotevet, at kotevet, hi kotevet.
Learn – Ani lomedet, at lomedet, hi lomedet.

I, You and She in Hebrew translation

From the two tables above you can see two things:

1. In Hebrew there are no “present simple” and “present progressive” tenses – there is only one form of “present,” and the verb remains the same for the singular persons, depending on the gender.

2. The difference between masculine and feminine is the “et” on the end of the feminine verbs. “Et” is the suffix for most feminine singular verbs. Most, but not every…

Lehitraot in lesson 35…

Heblish – Hebrew lessons: Day 33

Possessive

Free Hebrew lessons – July 2010 – Training – Day 33:

Hi,

Hot, very hot and humid, so… let’s try to cool off a bit…  

In our previous lesson we learned more about the word “from.” We learned how to say “from me” (mi’meni), “from you” (mi’m^a), “from him” (mi’meno) etc… and we began to explore word endings in Hebrew, and the information they tell us.

Today we’ll do a short review of “from,” learn something interesting about “water” and “sky,” look at the important possessive word “mine,” and finally, start looking at “tenses” in Hebrew. That sounds like a lot, but it will be easy! 

Today’s menu: New words-water, sky; the possessive word “mine”; introduction of “tenses”

Attention: The underlined letters represent the accent.

First, since it’s hot today, let’s drink some water…

Water

For water, you should say maim, in Hebrew.

In Hebrew the word for water, maim, is written using only three letters – “mem,” “yod” and “mem“.

Now for the interesting part…You can see that the first letter and the last letter are the same. This means that you can read it from right to left and also from left to right. It’s like a circle, like a mantra, a whole.
The idea conveyed is, that water is something endless, where it begins and ends no one knows…

Sky

For sky, you should say shamaim, in Hebrew.
The meaning of the word “sham” is “there,” and the meaning of “maim” you just learned…  Therefore “sky” (shamaim), means “there is water.”

If you open the first book in the Bible, Bereshit, you will see in chapter 1 verse 6, God separated the water which was under the sky from the water above the sky. This is a curious thing, but it can help you to remember how to say “sky” in Hebrew.

OK, now that we have had enough water… we can go ahead with our lesson.

In our previous lesson we learned the word “from” and I asked you to pay attention to the suffixes.

English Heblish Suffixes
From me Mi’meni i
From you (masculine) Mi’m^a ^a
From you (feminine) Mi’me^ ^
From him Mi’meno o
From her Mi’mena a
From us Me’itanu nu
From you (plural masculine) Mi’kem em
From you (plural feminine) Mi’ken en
From them (masculine) Me’hem hem
From them (feminine) Me’hen hen

 

Today I will show you a new word and its inflection – Mine.

English Heblish Suffixes
Mine Sheli i
Yours (masculine) Shel^a ^a
Yours (feminine) Shela^ ^
His Shelo o
Hers Shela a
Ours Shelanu nu
Yours (plural masculine) Shela^em em
Yours (plural feminine) Shela^en en
Their (masculine) Shelahem hem
Their (feminine) Shelahen hen

First, if you compare the two tables, you can see that there is something common between all the words in both tables – the endings. The suffixes are the same…

Second, notice in the table for “mine” that the first four letters are the same for each inflection, the letters “shel

Possessive

The word “shel” in Hebrew means “of” or “belonging to.”

Examples:
– This is my book – ze ha’sefer sheli.
Whose book is this? – shel mi ha’sefer ha’ze?
– This is Yaron’s book – ze ha’sefer shel Yaron.
– Right, this is his book – na^on, ze ha’sefer shelo.

In Hebrew there are 4 tenses but only 3 are really important to know: Past, Present and Future. That’s it!
Personally, I think that it’s enough.
– We are talking about yesterday, last year, our wedding…
– We are talking about today, what we are doing now and…
– We are talking about tomorrow, next year, our pension, etc… right?

So, these 3 tenses are what we need to learn. We already talked about tenses in lesson 14, and I won’t talk about them today; I just wanted to introduce the subject, again. Next lesson, we’ll really dig into tenses.

Today we’ve learned:

1. How to say “water” and “sky,” maim and shamaim,
2. We’ve seen that the inflections for “from” and “mine” give us the same suffixes – (personal endings),
3. We learned the word for “of / belonging to”, shel, and its inflections and…
4. We mentioned the 3 tenses in Hebrew: past, present and future.

Lehitraot in lesson 34 … 😉

Heblish – Hebrew lessons: Day 32

Preposition

Free Hebrew lessons – July 2010 – Training – Day 32:

Hi,

I hope you have recovered from last week’s lesson… 😉

 

In our previous lesson we learned some basics on how to use the preposition “from” in Hebrew.

 

As promised, today we’ll continue to look at the word “from” and expand our knowledge of this very important preposition. We will also begin to study word endings, which is critical in Hebrew. 

Today’s menu: Preposition “from” & personal “endings”

Attention: The underlined letters represent the accent.

 

From

We already know that for from you should say “min” in Hebrew, but actually we don’t really say “min.”  In Heblish we use “me” or “mi” for that word.

We learned that when I say “I took the book from Susan,” I say
laka^ti et ha’sefer mi‘Susan, and when I say “I took the book from the library” I say
laka^ti et ha’sefer me‘ha’sifriya.

Let’s see more examples:
– I asked for the guitar from John – bikashti et ha’gitara mi‘John.
– I drank from the bottle – shatiti me‘ha’bakbuk.
– I drank from a bottle – shatiti mi‘bakbuk.
– From me to you (masculine) – mimeni ele^a.
But when you say “from the United States,” I say mi‘artsot ha’brit.”
 

As I said, there are no rules that I can teach you to know when to use “me” and when to use “mi,” but how do you say: I took the book from him, from her or from them?…

That’s what we’re going to learn today, and I will also add (for the first time in our Heblish lessons) the words written in Hebrew.

  

English

Heblish

Hebrew

From me

Mi’meni

ממני

From you (masculine)

Mi’m^a

ממך

From you (feminine)

Mi’me^

ממך

From him

Mi’meno

ממנו

From her

Mi’mena

ממנה

From us

Me’itanu

מאיתנו

From you (plural masculine)

Mi’kem

מכם

From you (plural feminine)

Mi’ken

מכן

From them (masculine)

Me’hem

מהם

From them (feminine)

Me’hen

מהן

 

Pay close attention to the endings of the words in the table above.  We will now start to learn personal word endings (suffixes). These endings give us important information:
 

For the first person (I am/me) “ani“, the end of the word is “i” (sounds like “ee”).
Let’s place it on a table:

 

English

Heblish

Suffixes

From me

Mi’meni

i

From you (masculine)

Mi’m^a

^a

From you (feminine)

Mi’me^

^

From him

Mi’meno

o

From her

Mi’mena

a

From us

Me’itanu

nu

From you (plural masculine)

Mi’kem

em

From you (plural feminine)

Mi’ken

en

From them (masculine)

Me’hem

hem

From them (feminine)

Me’hen

hen

 

The above table will help us during our next lessons. Just keep the “ending sounds” in your mind.

I know this looks daunting, but it will become clearer as we progress through our lessons. Just stick with me and you will be surprised at how much you really CAN learn!

 

Lehitraot in lesson 33 … wink small icon

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