Free Hebrew Calendar

The Hebrew calendar is a lunisolar calendar that is used today primarily for Jewish religious purposes. It is named after the prophet Moses, who originally proposed it as a Calendar of laws to govern the Israelites in their wilderness wanderings. The Hebrew calendar is based on lunar cycles and was probably first used as a calendar by agriculturists and shepherds as early as c. 10 000 BC for agricultural activities such as planting seasons, sowing, harvesting and calculating the end of the growing season. The ancient Egyptians also made use of it and developed it into an astrological calendar. Later, various other cultures began to use it as well, including Greeks, Arabs and Christians. Today it continues to be used by Jews.
The Hebrew calendar is a lunisolar calendar meaning that it has both visible moon phases and invisible solar cycles or Seasons . Solar eclipses are not visible in any location throughout the year but occur at intervals only during certain specific seasons of the year known as Metzora or Rachin between spring months or Atonement between autumn months known as Tishah or Adar when the New Year begins. Thus there are 12 Months in a year instead of our usual 31 that fall uniformly throughout the year except for a few minor exceptions which are explained here below

Hebrew calendar months and days

The Hebrew calendar is a lunisolar calendar meaning that it has both visible moon phases and invisible solar cycles or Seasons. The Jewish year begins on the new moon of the first month of Tishah (Adar) which is at the same time as the vernal equinox and ends with the new moon of Tishah (Adar) which is at the same time as the autumnal equinox.

The months are numbered consecutively from Nisan to Adar and each month corresponds with a season. Each season starts with a “new month” and ends with a “new month”. For example, when Adar begins, so does Nissan; when Nissan begins, so does Iyar; etc. There are 12 months in a year instead of our usual 31 that fall uniformly throughout the year except for a few minor exceptions which are explained in more detail below:

For example, when Adar begins, so does Nissan; when Nissan begins, so does Iyar; etc. There are 12 months in a year instead of our usual 31 that fall uniformly throughout the year except for a few minor exceptions which are explained in more detail below:

Hebrew calendar years

There are 12 months in a Hebrew calendar year, where a leap month is added in between two consecutive months of the same season. The years have no fixed length but an integer value and represent different lengths of time depending on their order. For example, the year 5776 is equal to 7 x 365 days or 569 days.
The Hebrew calendar is typically written with the current day first followed by the other days (Sunday through Saturday), then the month and finally the year, without any need for punctuation where there are gaps such as between years and between months. In some cases, however, certain punctuations may be used to mark certain events such as holidays and new moons.

Months in the Hebrew calendar with links to articles

Month Aries March/April Pisces June/July Sagittarius October/November Capricorn December/January Aquarius February/March

Month Tishah September/October Gemini November/December Cancer January/February Leo March/April Virgo May/June Libra July/August Scorpio October/November Ophiuchus December/January Sagittarius January/February

Month Adar March / April
Gemini May / June
Cancer July / August
Aquarius September / October
Pisces November / December

Hebrew calendar festivals and event dates

The Hebrew calendar has five different seasons, one of which is the Jewish Day of Atonement, known by Jews as Yom Kippur. The first day of each month also falls between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Other major festivals include Passover, Shavuot, Sukkot and Hanukkah.

The Hebrew calendar is a lunisolar calendar meaning that it has both visible moon phases and invisible solar cycles or Seasons . Solar eclipses are not visible in any location throughout the year but occur at intervals only during certain specific seasons of the year known as Metzora or Rachin between spring months or Atonement between autumn months known as Tishah or Adar when the New Year begins. Thus there are 12 Months in a year instead of our usual 31 that fall uniformly throughout the year except for a few minor exceptions which are explained here below:

What is a Solar Eclipse in the Hebrew Calendar?

A solar eclipse in the Hebrew calendar occurs when the moon completely blocks the sun for a period of time. The Hebrew calendar uses lunisolar meaning that it has both solar and lunar cycles. During a solar eclipse, the moon blocks out all visible light from the sun so that we can only see it by using headlights, flashlights, or other sources of illumination.
There are 12 months in a year with 3 seasons each having 4 weeks which make up 7 days in total. If you were to calculate the Solar Eclipse based on these 12 months and seasons, you would find that there are 10 Total Solar Eclipses throughout the year. The first solar eclipse occurs at Metzora between spring months or Atonement between autumn months known as Tishah or Adar when the New Year begins. Thus there are 12 Months in a year instead of our usual 31 that fall uniformly throughout the year except for a few minor exceptions which are explained here below

The Metzora period and Rachin period in the Hebrew Calendar

The Metzora period is the time of year between the Spring months (or Nissan) and the Autumn month of Elul when a person is supposed to undergo the ritual prescribed by Judaism for healing from skin diseases or other illnesses. The Metzora period lasts 7 days and begins on the first day of Rosh Chodesh Nissan which is after the New Year.
The Rachin period is the time of year between the Autumn months (or Tishah) and Elul. Rachin lasts ten days and begins on 10th day of Tishah, i.e., on 29th of Elul. This time is observed by fasting and wearing sackcloth.

Jewish holidays in the Hebrew Calendar

Jewish holidays in the Hebrew Calendar are spread over a span of time from the first day of Passover to the last day of Tisha B’av. This lunar-synodic-solar calendar is used to regulate the phases of months, agricultural work and festivals.
There are 12 months in a year which are determined by astronomical phenomena known as Meteors or Metzorot. Please scroll down for more information below

Conclusion

The Hebrew calendar is a Jewish lunar calendar. It is the primary calendar used today for Jewish religious observances. In Hebrew, it is called שמות shmot, from a root that means “to count”. It is also known as Tz’uṭra (צוטרא) or by its abbreviation of תורה Torah. The Hebrew calendar is based on a Luni-Solar cycle of 19 years, but an intercalary month is added to compensate for the lack of solar terms in a 19-year cycle.

FAQ’s

What is the Hebrew calendar?

The Hebrew calendar was created by Moses on a celestial body (probably the moon) for the purpose of coordinating Israel’s agricultural months with their seasons on earth. It was based on observations of the sky, and eventually came to be used by most of the world’s Jews. It is a lunisolar calendar, with months beginning on the day after the new moon. The extra day between full moons was inserted so that there would be an exact total of 11 days in a month (one solar day). Because the lunar cycles are not constant, however, the actual date of each new moon gradually becomes farther and farther off from the predicted date. The Jewish civil calendar corrects for these errors by adding or subtracting a small amount called an epagomenal day.

How was the Hebrew calendar developed?

In ancient Israel, the cycle of days and nights was based on the phases of the moon and was called a ‘calendar’. This is genesis 1:14-16. In talmudic times there were two calendars. The first was Rosh Hashana (beginning of spring), 5 months behind the Gregorian calendar. The second was Pesach (Passover) which was 7 months behind Rosh Hashana. As the years progressed, each day would be seven hours longer than the day before it, so that eventually Rosh Hashana would arrive on April 22, for example.

There was also an agricultural calendar of 12 lunar months called Sivan (hare’s reproductive season), calculated based on the number of days in a lunar cycle when female offspring are born. Additionally there were 12 months in the civil year, determined by civil event or festival such as Passover month or [Cow] sacrifice month (Aus).

The Jewish calendar is completely artificial and does not have a single feature that nodes to historical reality. It diverges from the seasons at least by one month (Sivan loses one day to Nisan in May). Its determination program has been developed over thousands of years and however chaotic it may be, no one could change it currently.

What are its primary uses?

The primary uses of the Hebrew calendar are:

1. Religious: It is used to mark holy days such as Passover and Purim.
2. Official: It is used in Jewish civil courts, and to date Jewish historical events such as the creation of Israel.
3. Personal: People use it to determine the beginning of their menstrual cycle and predict when they will get pregnant.

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Yaron Gordon

Yaron Gordon

Yaron Gordon, owner of one of the most exclusive jewelry boutiques in Israel, Goood, is stepping out of his comfort zone and creating a new way to benefit his customers and friends.

selected lessons

Heblish Lesson: Day 6

“Vocalizing” – Phonetic Lesson. Free Heblish Challenge – January 2010

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Heblish Lesson: Day 5

“Vocalizing” – Phonetic Lesson. Free Heblish Challenge – January 2010

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Heblish Lesson: Day 4

“Vocalizing” – Phonetic Lesson. Free Heblish Challenge – January 2010

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Free Hebrew Getting Started
Getting Started

Free Heblish Challenge – December 2009 – Training – Day

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Basic pronunciation of numbers

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