Free Hebrew Alphabet Chart

Hebrew is an ancient language that has been spoken by Jewish people since biblical times. It is also the official language of modern Israel and one of the official languages recognized in the State of Israel alongside Arabic and English.
Of course, you can’t really learn a new language without learning its letters first. And if you want to learn Hebrew, then it’s essential that you know how it’s written as well.
Not only does knowing how to read Hebrew letters help with reading and writing, but it’s also an essential skill for every Hebrew learner. It gives you access to over 30 different prayer books (Hagadah), religious texts, poetry and more. So check out this guide so that you can easily recognize Hebrew letters as well as their associated sounds (cantillation).

How to Learn Hebrew

To learn Hebrew, you’ll need to study Hebrew grammar, which includes pronunciation and vocabulary.
While studying Hebrew, it’s important that you learn how to read the language and write it correctly. For that, there are some helpful guides at Google Education. You can also check out resources like the Jewish Virtual Library or The Jewish Learning Initiative for more information.
There are many ways to learn Hebrew. If you want an interactive experience, then there are tons of games available online that teach the letters and sounds in a fun way. Another option is to download an app like HiLingo, which will help you learn the language in a fun and effective way. Or if you prefer a more hands-on approach then enroll in school or take classes at your local community center or synagogue.

The Alphabet in Hebrew

The Hebrew alphabet is composed of 22 letters, with five additional characters as marks. It is one of the oldest alphabets in use today and makes up the original alphabet to which all other modern alphabets are based on.
The Hebrew alphabet is made up of three lines with each line containing several letters. The first line has nine letters, the second line has ten and the third line has six letters. Each letter corresponds to a different sound.

Shorthand for Hebrew Letters

The most commonly used shorthand for Hebrew letters is the Hebrew alphabet. The alphabet includes the letter “He” (ה) and the letter “Aleph” (א).
A more complex shorthand for letters is called cantillation. Cantillation gives you a visual representation of how to pronounce each letter, vowel and consonant. You can find this in prayer books, but it’s not something that’s meant for everyday use.

Pronunciation of Hebrew Letters

The pronunciation of Hebrew letters is a little bit different from the English letters you’re used to. Let’s take a look at some of the letters in Hebrew and their equivalents in English:

נ n  – n in English

ב b  – b in English

צ ts  – ch in English

ט t  – d in English

Confusion May Arise Between Vowels and Cantillation Marks?

One of the things that may confuse Hebrew learners is how they are written. Are they vowels or are they cantillation marks?
In order to answer this question, you first need to understand the difference between a vowel and a cantillation mark. A vowel is the letter “a” in English. It has a long pronunciation and can be silent at the beginning of words. Examples include “chai” (life), “matzah” (unleavened bread) and “shalom” (peace). A cantillation mark, on the other hand, is an accent used in biblical chanting. These marks also have a short pronunciation and usually start with an apostrophe ‘ (Aleph). Examples include אאאאאאווו׳׳׳׳עההה־ל־ל־ל־ל־ח־מ־ששששתתתהההיייייתיתית:

Vowel בּ ב בּ | גּ گ ɡ | ǽ ɛ j
Cantillation Mark ? ? ? :

Conclusion

Knowing how to read Hebrew will help you decipher the Holy Scriptures and thereby, grow closer to the Almighty. Hebrew is a difficult language to learn, but it is not impossible. The process of learning Hebrew is often slow and gradual, but it can be done by anyone. With this free Hebrew Alphabet Chart, you can start learning the Hebrew Alphabet.

FAQ’s

What is the importance of knowing how to read Hebrew letters?

The importance of knowing how to read Hebrew letters can’t be understated.
The letters of the Hebrew alphabet are the building blocks of the language and provide you with the foundation that allows you to become fluent.
Knowing how to read Hebrew letters will allow you to read and understand more from a book, newspaper, or even a street sign.
In addition to being an important foundational skill for learning Hebrew, it is also an essential component for being able to speak the language fluently.

What are the benefits of learning how to read Hebrew letters?

The best way to learn how to read Hebrew letters is by practicing. Find a copy of your favorite Hebrew book or magazine, and try to read it as much as you can. If you’re learning to read texted, try learning to type in Hebrew, too. If you can type in Hebrew and read the text on the screen at the same time, that’s some progress!

When you begin reading text in a book or magazine, familiarize yourself with all the letters’ shapes and their order. The shape of a letter is also important; if you recognize the shape of a letter before you can read it, then you won’t have to think about what letter it is while you are reading. This will help your reading speed.

Practice reading short stories and poems from different sources. Try reading them with a soft voice and with expression so that you can practice reading in different situations.

How can you learn how to read Hebrew letters?

There are 31 letters that make up the Hebrew alphabet, but they don’t all look the same! If you’re looking to learn how to read Hebrew letters, it’s important to know the different shapes and forms of the letters in order to recognize them in text.
In this article, I’ll teach you the different letter forms and their names. As you progress, you’ll be able to recognize them in texts and begin to read Hebrew on your own!

A – א (a as in apple)
B – ב (b as in boy)
C – כ (k as in kite)
D – ד (d as in dog)
Dee – דּ (th d as in that)
E – א (e as in teen)
F – פ (p as in map)
G – ג (g as in go)
H – ה (h as in hat)
I – ע (i like y but with an ‘i’ sound at the end.)
J – ז (z as in zoo)
K – כְּכוֹרָיוֹתֶיךָ primarily kashkurotayechasim (#; using a second # for the ‘o’), and also kashkuryakhorayemet (#; using a third # for ‘ay’).(#))#.##.###.###.###.###.###.###.###.###.###.###.###.##.(at least half of the pile of #s).#####.##.(The second one is a separate word).(Where the first one is very rare, the second one is so rare we have only a single instance).##.#######.(#%-listed word out there).#######.(Purely a notation, never used)(#%-listed word out there).#######.(A notation usally used)(Please correct if wrong on any of these, I’m still learning all this myself))##.#######.(Very rare).#############################(Spell it this way if you’re introducing it to someone who knows nothing yet)(Please correct if wrong on any of these, I’m still learning all this myself))##.###############.(Very rare).###############################(Spell it this way if you

Share with your friends:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
Yaron Gordon

Yaron Gordon

Yaron Gordon, owner of one of the most exclusive jewelry boutiques in Israel, Goood, is stepping out of his comfort zone and creating a new way to benefit his customers and friends.

selected lessons

Heblish Lesson: Day 6

“Vocalizing” – Phonetic Lesson. Free Heblish Challenge – January 2010

Share with your friends:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
Heblish Lesson: Day 5

“Vocalizing” – Phonetic Lesson. Free Heblish Challenge – January 2010

Share with your friends:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
Heblish Lesson: Day 4

“Vocalizing” – Phonetic Lesson. Free Heblish Challenge – January 2010

Share with your friends:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
Free Hebrew Getting Started
Getting Started

Free Heblish Challenge – December 2009 – Training – Day

Share with your friends:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon

Basic pronunciation of numbers

Learn to Read Hebrew in 6 Weeks (Hebrew for Beginners) Paperback – Large Print

This proven method will have you reading the Hebrew Alphabet in 6 weeks or less
The Hebrew Alphabet can look intimidating, but this book will have you reading it in 6 weeks. Even people who have tried other books without success have learned to read Hebrew using this book.