Be Free Hebrew

Hebrew is a Semitic language originating from the Northwest of Arabia. It is one of the oldest languages in the world and has been used as a divine language by many ancient civilizations including the Babylonians, Assyrians, Egyptians, and Persians. Hebrew has an estimated 22 million native speakers around the world today with significant populations being found in Israel, Canada, United States, South Africa, England and Australia. Hebrew is an incredibly beautiful language to listen to with its deep rhythms and flowing vocabulary.
Hebrew is an etymological language that derives its meaning from other words it uses. For example, the word ‘to ~’ means to strike or hit while ‘~’ means to separate or remove. This means that whenever you see a word ending with ‘-a’ (such as Chaya meaning sweet), you can be certain that it will have some sort of positive connotation attached to it. As a result of this, there are several different ways in which you can learn Hebrew; some easier than others depending on your level of proficiency with languages in general as well as how much time you have available to spend learning it.

Hebrew Basics course

The first way to learn Hebrew is by taking the Hebrew Basics course. This is a free online course that teaches basic language skills and vocabulary to those who are just beginning to learn the language. It also provides students with an opportunity to understand the meaning of words and phrases in their native context as well as provide insight into a language’s grammar and pronunciation.
The second way to learn Hebrew is by taking a more advanced level course. A wide range of courses are available, but they all require some sort of payment. One popular option is the Modern Hebrew course which provides bachelors-level education in this beautiful language. The teacher has been teaching in Israel for over 30 years and has taught hundreds of students from across the world how to speak fluent modern Hebrew.

Online Hebrew courses

Online courses are an excellent way to learn Hebrew. These courses can be found for free online or as a paid subscription service. You’re able to easily find one that you’ll enjoy and will fit your schedule and preferences. This is a great way to make sure that your language learning experience is enjoyable, interesting and productive.
There are several different types of online Hebrew courses; in particular, those that focus on grammar, pronunciation, vocabulary building and cultural immersion. These courses all vary in price so be sure you know what you’re getting into before investing your time in any one specific course or provider.

Learn with an app in Hebrew

There are certain apps that make it easy for you to learn Hebrew. For example, Duolingo is an app that helps you learn languages such as Spanish, French, and now Hebrew. It’s easy to use and has a simple design that makes it accessible for everyone. The app doesn’t require any experience with the language so it allows the user to learn without having to worry about memorizing grammar rules or vocabulary lists.
You can also use Memrise for your Hebrew learning needs. Memrise is a site where you can create personalized lessons and then review them in order to retain what you have learned on the site. This makes it easy for you to remember things that you would otherwise forget by not reviewing them regularly.
As a result of these two options, languages can be learned in a way that’s more accessible than traditional methods with less time spent learning them since there are no grammar rules or vocabulary lists needed in order to understand what is being taught during lesson time on either of these sites.

Learn to Read and Write in Hebrew

One of the easiest ways to learn Hebrew is to start by learning to read and write in it. The best way to do this is through a language exchange program or an online course. These are both reasonable and effective methods for learning Hebrew. There are also numerous online resources that offer free tutorials on how to read and write in Hebrew such as this website: https://www.hischolar.com/learn-to-read-and-write-in-hebrew/.

Get a Job in Hebrew

Hebrew is spoken by a significant population in Israel which means there are plenty of opportunities for those who want to work with the language. Many jobs in Hebrew require you to have a degree and experience with the language, but there are also many jobs that don’t.
There are a number of ways to get started finding jobs in Hebrew; one of these being through the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs website. You can find job listings on this site and apply online or by filling out an application form. Another popular way is applying through an employer’s website or directly contacting them via email. There are also some online job boards available such as Jerusalem-Jobs.org that you can use to find opportunities in Hebrew. The number of job openings has increased significantly over the past decade, primarily because more people have been learning it for educational purposes as well as for its cultural significance.

Conclusion

Learning Hebrew is no longer limited to the classroom. With online and offline Hebrew courses, learning to read, write, and speak Hebrew has never been easier.

FAQ’s

What is the etymology of Hebrew?

The etymology of Hebrew: The etymology of Hebrew is unclear, as the language was born from the plurality of Semitic languages. However we can aim for a few characteristics that point to its actual origin.

-The word for ‘one’ changes form for the singular and for the plural. The singular has a dot:Elohim (God) →Elohi; and in plural we have a dalet: Elohim (gods) → Elohi;

-The word for ‘eye’, is usually compounded to have a prefix joter/yod – this is because the concept of ‘eye’ is considered as one piece of body one;
a dual concept is expressed with one word. For example •hotir– eye + tentar, mountain – the joined words are hotir yod tetar; here, no words change in their form and their meaning but, they are just contracting to one single noun that denotes ‘eye of mountain’;

-The word for ‘hand’ doesn’t change its form in singular or plural. And: •hener or hep – hand + rener or reneph, face•
In considering these characteristics we can aim for an origin from Yemen at north of Arabia .
The Yemenis where semitic trilingualists speaking “South Arabian”, “Semitic” and “North–Semitic” varieties. The Southern Jews are found still in southern Yemen while they speaking gadyiya, also considered as Southern Arabic dialects with considerable admixture of Hebrew words. The Jewish communities in Bahrain and Qatar also speak Arabic yet still have some admixture (Talmud Babli Rosh Hashanah 10a)

What are the features of Hebrew?

The following are a few of the features of Hebrew:
1. Etymology: Hebrew is an etymological language that derives its meaning from the roots and meaning of the words. It is one of the oldest languages in the world and has been used as a divine language by many ancient civilizations including the Babylonians, Assyrians, Egyptians, and Persians.
2. Phonology: The phonology of Hebrew is extremely conservative and contains few inflexions compared to other languages. It has six vocalic phonemes and twenty-three consonants which are represented by twenty-two letters in the alphabet with one additional letter being used solely for vowel conjugation.
3. Morphology: Morphological inflection is almost nonexistent in Hebrew. This includes both declension and conjugation in many tenses such as past, present and future tense as well as verbal nouns and participles which can convey a sense of being tense or relaxed such as active, passive or habitual forms.
4. Vocabulary: The vocabulary of ancient Hebrew was full of complex words describing divine beings such as angels, ghosts, spirits, demons and messengers who were either people or animals transformed into those beings. Religious concepts included sacrifice, worship, holidays, pilgrimage sites and holy objects such as altars, arkons (tents) and Torahs (plural for torah).
5. Syntax: Subject-verb-object sentence construction makes up the syntax of Hebrew with independent clauses functioning as predication statements preceded by particles such as akh or ʔin (indeed). There also exists a subordinating conjunction called ʕever, which connects a subordinate clause to an independent clause to create a complex sentence if it does not begin with an ʔin particle followed by more independent clauses which all connect together with ʕever particles to form complex sentences that begin with ʕever particles combined with an adverbial particle kheri (however).

What are the unique features of Hebrew?

1. Unique features of Hebrew:

a). Hebrew has an extremely rich and complex vocabulary. Since it has been in use for thousands of years, it has accrued an extensive body of vocabulary. Many of these words are formed by combining successive roots found in the same word tree. This is a very technical way to create a word, but it is also very beautiful. For example, the word “Shalom” means peace in Hebrew (peace + oneness).
b). Hebrew is a highly agglutinative language. That is, it uses lots of particles to construct grammatical constructs such as relative clauses and dependent clauses. A popular example would be someone who is going to church “tomorrow” and then “after lunch”. These two statements are dependent on one another because if the first one were true, then the second would not be necessary anymore. In Hebrew, the second one does not exist without the first one: bnog et haaretz et hainan bnana yachol shawol koresh– If you leave at 1:00 pm and come back at 3:00 pm you will miss the whole show. The whole show starts at 4:00 pm so if you arrive after 3:00 pm then you will miss it all- c). Hebrew has a remarkable system of declension with case endings that allows for a great deal of flexibility when creating adjectives, adverbs and nouns. For example, since “good” can have many meanings (from nice to healthy), all those meanings are expressed by using different case endings in order to agree with the preceding noun– Shesh shuqa –good; Shesh mishma -good; Shesh tsachma -healthy; Shesh labber -nice; Shesh souko -whatever; Shesh saghma -whatever b). One feature that makes Hebrew stand out from other languages is its unique sound system which employs unique letter combinations (called ‘sequences’), like ‘Ch’ for hard or ‘Sh’ for soft ‘s’, for example our English letters CH and SH respectively both derive from Semitic ‘Q’, SH from Semitic ‘S’. Amongst these sounds are ‘Ayin’, representing our English letter E pronounced in short vowel sound; ‘Chole Sho’, used in written nigthime instead of Shabbat or evening prayers; One conson

Share with your friends:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
Yaron Gordon

Yaron Gordon

Yaron Gordon, owner of one of the most exclusive jewelry boutiques in Israel, Goood, is stepping out of his comfort zone and creating a new way to benefit his customers and friends.

selected lessons

Heblish Lesson: Day 6

“Vocalizing” – Phonetic Lesson. Free Heblish Challenge – January 2010

Share with your friends:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
Heblish Lesson: Day 5

“Vocalizing” – Phonetic Lesson. Free Heblish Challenge – January 2010

Share with your friends:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
Heblish Lesson: Day 4

“Vocalizing” – Phonetic Lesson. Free Heblish Challenge – January 2010

Share with your friends:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
Free Hebrew Getting Started
Getting Started

Free Heblish Challenge – December 2009 – Training – Day

Share with your friends:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon

Basic pronunciation of numbers

Learn to Read Hebrew in 6 Weeks (Hebrew for Beginners) Paperback – Large Print

This proven method will have you reading the Hebrew Alphabet in 6 weeks or less
The Hebrew Alphabet can look intimidating, but this book will have you reading it in 6 weeks. Even people who have tried other books without success have learned to read Hebrew using this book.