Posts Tagged 'ma ha’shaa'

Heblish – Hebrew lessons: Day 22

Conny’s story – Part II

Free Hebrew lessons – May 2010 – Training – Day 22:

Shalom,

In our previous lesson we celebrated Mother’s Day and learned how to talk about members of our family, such as: ima (mother/mom), aba (father/daddy), a^ (brother), a^ot (sister), savta (grandmother) and saba (grandfather). 

Today let’s continue with Conny’s story, which we started in Lesson 20. You will remember that we read the beginning of Conny’s story, corrected her Heblish and also learned many new Hebrew words such as: yom (day), hayom (today), ^adash (new), kniyot (shopping), kesef (money), etc… If you need a refresher, please go back to the end of lesson 20 and look at the table of new words we learned in that lesson.

Reminder for part I of Conny’s story: 
English:
A new day!
This is a new day. First, I had breakfast at the Hilton Hotel at nine. So, the beginning of the day was good.  At ten I wanted to go to the bank for money. Why? For shopping, of course! There was no bus, so I took a taxi. I asked the receptionist to call the taxi for me. 

Heblish:
Yom ^adash!
Ze yom ^adash. Reshit, a^alti aru^at boker be’malon Hilton be’tesha. Az, ha’hat^ala shel ha’yom haita tova. Be’eser ratsiti lale^et la’bank bishvil lehotsi kesef. Lama? Le’kniyot bevadai! Lo haya otobus, az laka^ti monit. Bikashti mi’pkid hakabala lehitkasher la’monit bishvili.

Now we will continue with Conny’s story.

Today’s menu: Conny’s story – Part II

Attention: The underlined letters represent the accent.

As we did in our previous lesson, let’s look at Conny’s paragraph as is and afterwards we will analyze it.

Let’s start:
“A New Day” by Conny – Part II:

The taxi driver drives smola, yamina ve yashar for 5 miles to ha’bank. After shopping ani go to ha’misada. Ze thohoraim, ha’zman for lunch. Ani ratsiti dag ve chips aval lo ketjup. Ze ha’misada tova. Amarti toda raba ve ani asked ha’meltzar:”ma ha’shaa”? Amarta(?) ha’shaa arba. Ha’zman to go home. Lakachti ha’otobus to ha’malon. It was ha’yom tov!

Now let’s translate it into English and fix Conny’s Heblish.

The taxi driver drove left, right, then straight ahead for 5 miles to the bank. After shopping I went to a restaurant. It was noon, time for lunch. I wanted fish and French fries, but no ketchup. The restaurant was good. I said “thanks a lot” and asked the waiter “what is the time?” He said “the time is four o’clock.” It was time to go home. I took a bus to the hotel. It was a good day.
Note: We have not yet learned all of the Heblish words presented in this story, but this will be a good opportunity for you to learn more words.

Conny’s story: The taxidriver drives smola, yamina ve yashar
English
: The taxi driver drove left, right, then straight ahead…
Heblish: Nehag ha’monit nasa smola, yamina ve’az yashar. (“taxi driver” is nahag monit, but “the taxi driver” is nehag ha’monit, “drove” is nasa)

 

Conny’s story: …for 5 miles to ha’bank.
English: …for 5 miles to the bank.
Heblish: lemeshe^ ^amisha miles la’bank (we will learn the word “for” another time,  ”to the bank” is la’bank)

Nehag ha’monit nasa smola, yamina ve’az yashar lemeshe^ ^amisha miles la’bank.

Conny’s story: After shopping ani go to ha’misada.
English: After shopping I went to a restaurant.
Heblish: A^arey ha’kniyot hala^ti le’misada. (“After” is a^arey, ”I went” is hala^ti)

Nehag ha’monit nasa smola, yamina ve’az yashar lemeshe^ ^amisha miles la’bank. A^arey ha’kniyot hala^ti le’misada.

Conny’s story: Ze thohoraim,
English: It was noon,
Heblish: Ze haya ba’tsohoraim, (“it” is ze, “was” is haya)

Conny’s story: …ha’zman for lunch.
English: … time for lunch.
Heblish: zman le’aru^at tsohoraim.

Nehag ha’monit nasa smola, yamina ve’az yashar lemeshe^ ^amisha miles la’bank. A^arey ha’kniyot hala^ti le’misada. Ze haya ba’tsohoraim, zman le’aru^at tsohoraim.

Conny’s story: Ani ratsiti dag ve chips aval lo ketjup.
English: I wanted fish and French fries, but no ketchup.
Heblish: Ratsiti dag ve’chips aval lo ketchup. (“but” is aval)

Conny’s story: Ze ha’misada tova.
English: The restaurant was good.
Heblish: Ha’misada haita tova.

Nehag ha’monit nasa smola, yamina ve’az yashar lemeshe^ ^amisha miles la’bank. A^arey ha’kniyot hala^ti le’misada. Ze haya ba’tsohoraim, zman le’aru^at tsohoraim. Ratsiti dag ve’chips aval lo ketchup. Ha’misada haita tova.

Conny’s story: Amarti toda raba ve ani asked ha’meltzar ”ma ha’shaa?” 
English: I said thanks a lot and asked the waiter “what is the time?”
Heblish: Amarti toda raba ve’shaalti et ha’meltsar “ma ha’shaa?” (“I asked” is shaalti [sha-al-ti])

Conny’s story: Amarta(?) ha’shaa arba.
English: He said “the time is four o’clock.”
Heblish
: Hu amar “ha’shaa arba.” (“he” is hu, “said” (for masculine) is amar)

Nehag ha’monit nasa smola, yamina ve’az yashar lemeshe^ ^amisha miles la’bank. A^arey ha’kniyot hala^ti le’misada. Ze haya ba’tsohoraim, zman le’aru^at tsohoraim. Ratsiti dag ve’chips aval lo ketchup. Ha’misada haita tova. Amarti toda raba ve’shaalti et ha’meltsar ma ha’shaa? Hu amar: ha’shaa arba.

Conny’s story: Ha’zman to go home.
English: It was time to go home.
Heblish: Ze haya ha’zman lale^et habaita. (“to go” is lale^et, “home” is bait, but when going in the direction of home I say habaita

Conny’s story: Lakachti ha’otobus to ha’malon.
English: I took a bus to the hotel.
Heblish: Laka^ti otobus la’malon. (“I took” is laka^ti, “to the hotel” is la’malon)

Conny’s story: It was ha’yom tov!
English: It was a good day!
Heblish: Ze haya yom tov!

Nehag ha’monit nasa smola, yamina ve’az yashar lemeshe^ ^amisha miles la’bank. A^arey ha’kniyot hala^ti le’misada. Ze haya ba’tsohoraim, zman le’aru^at tsohoraim. Ratsiti dag ve’chips aval lo ketchup. Ha’misada haita tova. Amarti toda raba ve’shaalti et ha’meltsar ma ha’shaa? Hu amar: ha’shaa arba. Ze haya ha’zman lale^et habaita. Laka^ti otobus la’malon. Ze haya yom tov!

End of  Conny’s story.

Hey, I really enjoyed “Conny’s Story” of her day and we learned a lot!  Please feel free to send me your own “story,” because I think it’s a great way to teach and to learn. 

Lehitraot in lesson 23… ;-)

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Heblish – Hebrew lessons: Day 18

What follows is today’s lesson, where you are going to learn something regarding emotions.Everyone of us will react to things in completely different ways. Some people might cry watching a TV show, others might feel happy playing Party poker and some may laugh out loud when reading a book. It is because we are all different people that we need to stick together in times of trouble,as some of us may be stronger than others. We hope you find the lesson interesting and you can learn from it.

Clock – Part I

Free Hebrew lessons – April 2010 – Training – Day 18:

Shalom,

This is a special week.  Holocaust Memorial Day (Yom Ha’Shoa) was on Monday, the IDF Fallen Remembrance Day (Yom Ha’zikaron) is next Monday, and Israeli Independence Day (Yom Ha’atsmaut) is on Tuesday.

In Israel, sadness and happiness sometimes come together, like Yom Ha’atsmaut following Yom Ha’zikaron, because we know that we wouldn’t be safe and happy without the sacrifice of those who fell in battle. But I’m sure that’s not just in Israel. In another example, one day you can receive good news and be happy all day, and the next day you can lose your beloved dog

That’s life. In Israel we have a saying: Time buries the sadness beside the dead.

 

In our previous lesson we talked about directions. We read Judy’s story and learned some new words like “yesh” for “there is,” “az” for “so” and “then,” “^anut” for “store” and “shop” and some other words like “bank,” “supermarket” and “misada” (restaurant).

If we return to the sentence “time buries the sadness beside the dead,” we can see how much “time” (zman, in Hebrew) controls our life. That’s why our lesson today will be about “time…”

Today’s menu: Clock

Attention: The underlined letters represent the accent.

In Hebrew lesson 11 we learned the numbers 1-12, and I kept that table for you here, at the Numbers tab.

When talking about “time,” we use feminine numbers.

The time is

For “the time is one o’clock” or “it is one o’clock” we say ha’shaa a^at.

Examples:
   – What is the time? – Ma ha’shaa? (sha-a)
   – It’s two o’clock. – Ha’shaa shtaim (or just shtaim).

   – When? – Matay?
   – At three o’clock – Be’shaa shalosh (or just be’shalosh).

   – What time is breakfast? – Matay aru^at ha’boker? (breakfast – aru^at boker)
   – Breakfast is at 8:00 A.M. – Aru^at ha’boker be’shmone.

You use A.M. and P.M., but we don’t. If breakfast is at 8 it can’t be at night, so we don’t use A.M. – but if there is any doubt, we add the following words: Boker (morning), tsohoraim (noon), a^ar ha’tsohoraim (afternoon), erev (evening) and laila for night.

Hours Time of Day
4 A.M. to 11 A.M. Morning – boker (lesson 2)
12 P.M. to 2 P.M. Noon – tsohoraim (tso-ho-raim)
2 P.M. to 4 P.M. Afternoon – a^ar ha’tsohoraim
5 P.M. to 9 P.M. Evening – erev
10 P.M. to 3 A.M. Night – laila (lesson 2)

The table above is general (approximate).

Let’s see more examples:
- I finish work at 5:00 P.M.Ani finish work be’^amesh.

- Please call me at 7:00 P.M.Bevakasha call me Be’shaa sheva ba’erev.

- I have an appointment at 11:00 A.M. – I have an appointment be’a^at-esre.

- The mail comes at 9:00 A.M. – The mail comes be’tesha.

- The restaurant opens at 1:00 P.M. – Ha’misada opens be’a^t (you can add ba’tsohoraim if it’s not clear that you mean to say 1:00 P.M.).

- The bank closes at 6:00 P.M.Ha’bank closes be’shesh.

Note:  Remember that it is acceptable to omit the word “shaa.”
If we talk about six o’clock, for example, we can say “be’shaa shesh” or just “be’shesh,” exactly as you say “at six o’clock” or just “at six.”
 

It was a short lesson and I think it was easy – this time… ;-)  

Lehitraot in lesson 19…

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